High Protein Diet Cause Bad Breath - Need A Mint?
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High Protein Diet Cause Bad Breath – Need A Mint?

High Protein Diet Cause Bad Breath - Need A Mint?
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Need A Mint?

Imagine yourself in this situation. You’re at work, or at school, and it’s lunchtime. You grab your food, whether it’s your packed lunch or from down the street. You begin munching on your meal, enjoying every bit of it. After finishing, you tidy up, throw away your trash, and begin resuming the rest of your day. Then you realize that your mouth starts to taste a little, well, foul from your lunch. Thinking back to what you ate, and upon further thinking, you realize that your lunch was high in the nutrient protein. It then comes to mind that you’ve been on a high protein diet recently, and have been experiencing some questionably bad breath. So does a high protein diet cause bad breath? If you’d like to find out, keep reading!

How Do You Get Bad Breath

I’m not sure who needs to hear this but, nobody likes bad-smelling breath. The proper scientific name for foul breath is called halitosis. One in four people experiences halitosis around the world globally. I’ll fill you in on so of the common causes of bad breath that even people like you and I are affected by. That’s some good information on its own by itself, but treatments to halitosis will also be given. I know at least one of you, or someone you know is going to benefit from knowing how to treat bad breath. Telling someone that they have bad breath is another challenge on its own, so I’ll stick to the science of bad breath.

Bad Oral Hygiene 

As the biggest culprit of stench breath, having bad oral care will always lead to you having bad breath. By oral care, I mean the way you take care of your pearly whites, if you brush your teeth, floss them, and last but not least, brush your tongue. I personally learned this a while ago; your tongue holds the most amount of bacteria in your mouth. So if you’re cleaning your teeth and forgetting about your tongue every night, you’ll still be having bad breath. You’ll notice if you don’t clean your tongue if it has white bacteria on it. Go ahead and take a look at your tongue in the mirror and decide if you need to rethink your oral routine.

High Protein Diet Cause Bad Breath - Need A Mint?

Even if your daily oral care routine is top-notch, and you think your teeth are as perfect as can be, you always should be hitting up the dentist every 6 months. The dentist goes ahead and deep clean your gums and teeth to prevent tooth decay. For those of you who are not completely familiar with tooth decay, it’s basically damage to your teeth that develop into tiny holes. I would provide a picture of what tooth decay could possibly look like, but I’ll let you click here to see it if we got any squeamish individuals reading this.

Dry Mouth 

A dry mouth somewhat goes hand in hand with bad oral hygiene. Your mouth should always feel refreshed, feeling as if you just brushed your teeth. Saliva is a fluid produced by our salivary glands that naturally cleans our teeth. When our mouths are dry, saliva isn’t produced as much. You can usually tell when your mouth is dry when you taste the inside of your mouth. The way we treat this? Drink water. Rehydrate your mouth by drinking fluids, especially water, since it leaves no bad aftertaste in your mouth.

Food Leftover 

Another huge causer of bad breath is food. The food we eat is a major cause of what our mouths taste like and what people smell of them. We breakdown foods in our mouths with no other than our teeth. You know that some foods tend to be hard to chew than others, but you eventually get through them. Also, some foods tend to stay in our teeth after we’re through chewing and swallowing them. Foods like popcorn, bread, and meat tend to stick around in your mouth a little longer, but any food can get stuck in your mouth.

High Protein Diet Cause Bad Breath - Need A Mint?

Some foods, however, can stay in your teeth and protrude an ominous odor on to the world. I’m talking about foods like garlic, onions, and fish that all let the world know what you had for lunch that day. Thankfully, in this case, there’s a solution to food stuck in our teeth. In the year 1882, the world was blessed with floss to clean between their teeth. This removes any gunk between your teeth and leaves them fresh and clean.

Protein and Bad Breath

So now we’ve arrived at the question at hand, how does protein affect the way your breath may smell. It all goes back to the scenario I mentioned in the beginning if higher amounts of protein can really be detrimental for your breath. The answer; yes, it may. There are several ways protein can affect your breath, and of course, I’ll list them to you.

Ammonia Gas 

To break down protein in your body, a gas called ammonia is released by your intestine to go to work on it. However, this gas may build-up and leave through your mouth and produce a foul odor. The gas has to do with the liver trying to break down some nutrients, more on the liver with protein by clicking here. To counteract this, chewing a piece of gum will surely do the trick.

Fish 

Fish is notorious for causing bad breath in our mouths. Everyone knows the wretched smell of fish, and no one wants it in their mouth. Like mentioned before, it tends to get stuck between your teeth for it to stink up for later. To solve it, floss your teeth immediately to get that gunk out.

Conclusion

There you have it, the high protein diet can affect your breath, for worse. It can get stuck in your teeth and ruin the nostrils of your peers for the rest of the day. The protein may also produce a gas named ammonia that surfaces up out our mouth that lets out a foul odor. It’s always smart to have a proper oral care routine to have a healthy smile. Consult your dentist every so often to make sure your chompers are healthy and functioning.

Got any questions? Leave them down below, along with any comments?